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European Literature

Review: The Pear Field by Nana Ekvtimishvili

Translated from the Georgian by Elizabeth Heighway Published by Peirene Press The Pear Field is a novel of juxtapositions. It is full of tragedy, but written with a calm joviality. It has a gothic tone but is populated by lovable characters, rather than ones you love to hate. It shocks and frightens you at one …

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14 Chilling Books Like Rebecca (New & Old)

Daphne du Maurier was known as a legend of atmospheric, unsettling gothic horror. Her magnum opus, Rebecca, is a perfect evolution of Bronte-esque gothic, and her short stories were often chilling nightmare fuel. But, for fans of Rebecca who are wanting more, what classic and modern books like Rebecca are out there to enjoy? Fans …

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Review: A Lover’s Discourse by Xiaolu Guo

Xiaolu Guo needs no introduction. Born in a Zhejiang fishing village, studied in Beijing, moved to London in 2002. Guo has directed several movies and documentaries since moving to the UK, and is perhaps best known for her novel A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers and her memoir Once Upon a Time in the East, …

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9 of the Best Translated Dystopian Novels (2020)

Dystopian novels are seeing a massive resurgence in popularity right now, due to the state of the political world we find ourselves living in. Novels written in the World War 2 era and during the Cold War have found relevance now more than ever before. We’re all digging out our old copies of Nineteen Eighty-Four …

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Review: The Revolt by Clara Dupont-Monod

Not long ago, my friend Taylor (of the publishing house Honford Star) offered an opinion about literature: that books longer than 300 pages rarely justify their own length. This got me thinking about the fantasy genre, and whether or not so many beloved fantasy epics need to be as long as they typically are. While …

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Review: Sea of Ink by Richard Weihe

Spending my twenties living in China and Japan, one of the first things I came to appreciate was the richly diverse ways in which cultures can approach art. And, by art, I mean painting, literature, music, even cooking. What we think we know about painting in the West (renaissance art, expressionism, impressionism etc) is, despite …

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Review: The Cat and the City by Nick Bradley

Nick Bradley’s Tokyo is an enormous and vivid tapestry, with each thread revealing the life of a person who has lived and worked there, who has shed tears and blood for Tokyo, who struggled through their darkest days and celebrated their greatest victories in Japan’s great metropolis. The Cat and the City offers us its …

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Review: Miss Iceland by Audur Ava Olafsdottir

Hekla’s father named her after a volcano. Four years after she was born, the volcano after which she was named erupted, and her volcano-obsessed father took Hekla in his Jeep to see the eruption. The sight forever stoked a burning fire in her, turning Hekla into a young woman who wanted nothing in the world …

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