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translated books of 2019

10 Must-Read Translated Novels Coming in 2019

What a year 2018 was! A year of incredible literature in translation, and the year that Books and Bao was born. Our list of Best Translated Books of 2018 barley skated the surface of the incredible ocean of translated literature released last year, and this list of upcoming books we’re looking forward to in 2019 barely does either (although this Guardian...

best translated books of 2018

Books and Bao’s Best Translated Fiction of 2018

While 2018 has been a tumultuous year in many ways, it has been a glorious one for translated literature – with a mighty new novel by fan-favourite Haruki Murakami and Olga Tokarczuk winning the Man Booker International Prize, we have so much to celebrate.   Related: 5 Must-Read Asian and Asian American Fiction from 2018 We’ve done our best to condense our biggest...

Frankenstein Shelley Junji Ito

Review: Junji Ito’s Frankenstein

Frankenstein written by Junji Ito |Translated by Jocelyne Allen When it comes to adaptation, book-lovers often feel divided. Some welcome film adaptations; others don’t see the point. Some spend hours debating which is better. I am of the opinion that a book and a film are too far apart to be compared clearly and fairly. But graphic adaptations exist in the gap...

Apple and Knife Novel Indonesian Literature

Review: Apple and Knife by Intan Paramaditha

Written by: Intan Paramaditha | Translated by Stephen J Epstein Most of us know that every country and culture has its folk tales and fairy tales, and most of us know that these often horrific tales of punishment, death, revenge, and tragedy have been muted and twisted into happy stories by Disney, and in Japan’s recent children’s anime Yokai Watch. But how can we...

Review: The Underground Village by Kang Kyeong-ae

Written by Kang Kyeong-ae | Translated by Anton Hur Even if The Underground Village were to be underwhelming, it is worth attention for being perhaps the only collection of stories to come out of Japanese-occupied Manchuria (written by a lower-class female Korean communist born in what is now North Korea) that you’ll ever read. Fortunately, thanks in no small part to...

hwang sok yong at dusk

Review: At Dusk by Hwang Sok-yong

Written by Hwang Sok-yong | Translated by: Sora Kim-Russell Have you ever listened to Big Yellow Taxi? I like the Counting Crows version. Hwang Sok-yong is arguably Korea’s most prestigious and well-respected living author; his most recently translated works – Familiar Things and Princess Bari – have garnered themselves heaps of praise across the English-speaking...

Review: City of Ash and Red by Hye-Young Pyun

Written by: Hye-Young Pyun | Translated by: Sora Kim-Russell Millennials are often accused of destroying a lot of things, but they have also been attributed to the resurgence of so much lost art, such as vinyl records and pixel-art video games. In literature, one of the greatest writers to receive a second life is Franz Kafka. More and more frequently we are seeing...

Japan Lonesome bodybuilder

Review: The Lonesome Bodybuilder (Picnic in the Storm)

Written by Yukiko Motoya | Translated by Asa Yoneda ‘Tomoko had married him of her own free will. Some of her friends had advised her to reconsider, but most people didn’t even seem to notice that he was straw.’ Two months ago I had already decided on my favourite novel, and novelist, of 2018: Convenience Store Woman and its author Sayaka Murata. I loved this book...