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Meet the Translator: Ainhoa Urquia (Korean to Spanish)

Born in Madrid, Ainhoa moved as a child to Málaga, a Southern coastal city known for being mentioned in an Ed Sheeran’s song and for being the actual place where Picasso was born. (No, he’s not from Catalonia. You’re thinking of Dalí.) Fond of literature from an early age, she won a Korean literature essay contest …

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Review: Junji Ito’s Frankenstein

Delve into the terrifying world of Junji Ito with this adaptation of the classic novel Frankenstein. When it comes to adaptation, book-lovers often feel divided. Some welcome film adaptations; others don’t see the point. Some spend hours debating which is better. I am of the opinion that a book and a film are too far …

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Meet the Translator: Jessica Ginting (Indonesian to English)

Jessica is a writer and translator born in Jakarta, Indonesia. She lives in London, graduated with a BA from Bristol University in English and is now studying a Publishing MA at UCL. She published and launched her poetry collection Moon Petals at the Ubud Writers and Readers festival in 2017. Part of the Meet the Translator …

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Meet the Translator: Louise Heal Kawai (Japanese to English)

Here’s our next installment of ‘Meet the Translator‘, where we aim to talk to translators from around the world. We’re catching up with Louise Heal Kawai, a Japanese to English literary translator. Louise comes from Manchester, UK and is based in Yokohama, Japan. Her most recently translated work is the gripping Seventeen by Hideo Yokoyama. Her other …

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Review: The New Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan

‘All roads used to lead to Rome. Today, they lead to Beijing.’ The subject of history is one that concerns politics, economics, and philosophy. Lessons from the past teach us how to proceed into the future. And yet, for so long, books on history have been simply that. Recently, however, a trend has emerged amongst …

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Review: The Underground Village by Kang Kyeong-ae

Even if The Underground Village were to be underwhelming, it is worth attention for being perhaps the only collection of stories to come out of Japanese-occupied Manchuria (written by a lower-class female Korean communist born in what is now North Korea) that you’ll ever read. Fortunately, thanks in no small part to some witty and …

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Meet the Translator: Anton Hur (Korean to English)

One of the most important and celebrated works of literature to come out of Korea in 2018 was Kyung-sook Shin’s The Court Dancer, a powerful work of historical literature based on a true story. And without the deft translation skills of Anton Hur, it would never have reached the English-speaking world. Following the book’s success, …

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Review: The Lonesome Bodybuilder (Picnic in the Storm)

Two months ago I had already decided on my favourite novel, and novelist, of 2018: Convenience Store Woman and its author Sayaka Murata. I loved this book for its daring to go against the norm, something that is often far more punk rock here in Japan than it is in the West. But as we …

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Review: Japan Story by Christopher Harding

For any curious lover of history, searching for an enlightening but comprehensive history of Japan, like what’s found here in Japan Story, there are many places to look. Just last year, Jonathan Clements published his excellent A Brief History of Japan, which does exactly as it says on the tin. Another book to capture the …

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The Keshiki Series: New Voices from Japan (Part 2)

Here is the second of two articles summarising and reviewing the stories found in the Keshiki series, brought to you by Strangers Press. Click here if you missed part one. What is the Keshiki Series? Eight chapbooks, each containing a tale (or tales) of around thirty or forty pages, all by Japanese authors of varying …

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