Skip to Content

Will Heath

Will predominantly writes about the books of Books and Bao, examining the literature of a place and how the authors have used the art of storytelling to reflect the world and the culture around them.

Review: The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

“People with no experience of God tend to think that leaving the faith would be a liberation, a flight from guilt, rules, but what I couldn’t forget was the joy I’d known, loving Him.” John Leal, whose name is always written and spoken of in full, was detained in a North Korean gulag. Upon release …

Read More about Review: The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

Author Spotlight: Banana Yoshimoto

When I first read and reviewed Banana Yoshimoto’s seminal work, Kitchen, I mentioned how it tackled ‘the brevity of life, and the dangerous potential of love and happiness to be painfully fleeting’. This theme is not only true for Kitchen but for all of Yoshimoto’s writing. It is, in a nutshell, what makes her tick …

Read More about Author Spotlight: Banana Yoshimoto

Pixar’s Bao: Discussed and Deconstructed

What is Pixar’s Bao? Pixar’s first female-directed short film, Bao, hit cinemas recently, tugging at the heartstrings of viewers worldwide before Incredibles II started to play. The latest in Pixar’s now famous shorts has quickly become a favourite for many, especially among those whom it spoke to the loudest: Asian immigrants to the West. But …

Read More about Pixar’s Bao: Discussed and Deconstructed

Hogan’s Korean Cooking Class: A Home Away From Home

Korean Cooking Classes: A Different Kind of Tourism At the risk of letting my privilege show, I’m going to boldly argue that travelling the world has never been easier, for most of us at least. With cheap flights, Airbnb, multilingual signage, and easy-to-obtain visas, many of us in the western world have the opportunity to …

Read More about Hogan’s Korean Cooking Class: A Home Away From Home

Seoul Queer Festival: Pride in the Face of Adversity

Two years ago, I was walking through Tokyo’s Shinjuku district when I was slapped across the face by a thousand rainbows. The Pride parade was in full force, singing and dancing and owning its vibe with, well, pride. To contrast this, the lead up to the Seoul Queer Festival has been marred with pre-emptive protests …

Read More about Seoul Queer Festival: Pride in the Face of Adversity

Discover The World of Vietnamese Coffee Culture

Get to know Vietnamese coffee, one of the best coffee styles in the world, its many types, and how to make it yourself at home. I was twenty-five and living in Shanghai when I discovered coffee. After two years together at the time, Jess had finally convinced me to try it. Naturally, after having taken …

Read More about Discover The World of Vietnamese Coffee Culture

Review: Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

When I was living in Inagi-shi, a once-upon-a-time small city now swallowed up by the swell of suburban Tokyo, I would enter the convenience store next to my apartment every morning and buy a sugar-soaked bun to walk to the station with. The convenience store woman who served me each and every morning at 8 …

Read More about Review: Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata

Scales of Injustice by Loa Ho: Champion of the Downtrodden

Scales of Injustice by Loa Ho | Translated by Darryl Sterk Living in twenty-first century Korea, the animosity levied against Japan by much of the population still holds true today, even amongst many young people. This animosity of course stems from Japan’s occupation of Korea from 1910 to 1945. Such hostility is arguably understandable, but …

Read More about Scales of Injustice by Loa Ho: Champion of the Downtrodden

Review: The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa

As a twenty-something who has, not for a moment, put learning and discovery behind him, I have spent several years now glued quite earnestly to YouTube as a means of studying things that escaped me as a child. Much like the housekeeper of The Housekeeper and the Professor, one of those things I missed out …

Read More about Review: The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa

Review: The Last Children of Tokyo (The Emissary) by Yoko Tawada

Dystopian fiction is arguably the most impactful, clever, and chilling kind of storytelling we have, but it has dipped in quality in recent years. That is until now, as we get a glimpse into the very near future with Yoko Tawada’s The Last Children of Tokyo or The Emissary in the US. It can take …

Read More about Review: The Last Children of Tokyo (The Emissary) by Yoko Tawada